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rtbiscuit

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About rtbiscuit

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    Z Supreme Being
  • Birthday 29/12/1981

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  1. with regards to the xenaphobia and racisim, its always been there, I deal as a teacher and have done over the last 13 years issues with anti sematism, anti black and anti asian issues. it is infrequent and i have seen it over 4 schools and all are graded outstanding. there has always been unpleasant undertones in our society, but they are the minority and will go back under their rocks once this has settled.
  2. On the understanding of oil and its economic taxation as discussed above i can be honest and say " I know Nothing" so over these aspects i can't comment, But both G and Chesterfield seem to understand it and it is making for interesting reading Everyday is a school day with regards to the xenaphobia and racisim, its always been there, I deal as a teacher and have done over the last 13 years issues with anti sematism, anti black and anti asian issues. it is infrequent and i have seen it over 4 schools and all are graded outstanding. there has always been unpleasant undertones in our society, but they are the minority and will go back under their rocks once this has settled.
  3. I daren't mention it at work, seems the majority of teachers were remainers and apparently devastated over the vote. I've heard the words, angry livid and mortified.
  4. I'm not a young voter nor am I old. But the young voice not being heard has to be partly put at the feet of the young. With only about 30% turnout those that feel deflated should be looking at the 70% who didn't bother. My students have been discussing this and any that voted out. Have been lambasted by their peers. And surprisingly higher amount at least in my area voted leave. With regards to the racism stance I find it ironic that the remain voters can keep a straight face when they wanted to stay in a system that promoted free movement, but was building fences and closing borders, gassing migrants and refugees at borders. Not only that they have been making deals with turkey to ship them all back to turkey and pay turkey to keep them there. Yes that sounds like the model system to me. It must be a long way up on some peoples moral high horses. Maybe they can't see all the facts as clearly. And if you thought we would have any sway in that, they have no interest in letting people in. They're just hoping they'll all get bored and go home from turkey.
  5. 907/23,093 = 3.92% i think that makes me an absolute Cupid Stunt
  6. I've seen this several times before and everytime i see it i find it incredibly narrow visioned and full of errors, i couldn't help my self and have added comments in blue
  7. to argue the amount of voters wasn't large enough or the % difference isn't big enough is odd, we've been seeing voter turnout at general elections as low as 40% for years, of which the winning party is made of just half that at best. means we have for years happily been voting in a controlling body that only 20% of the population actually voted for. and now we have a turnout of 75% of which half then voted to leave would suggest a far more accurate vote more representative of the populous than in the past. If we're going to discuss voting turnout as a key point then it needs to be changed in government and from that point on all votes and elections should be a compulsory turnout, but the option for "none of the above" should be on the voting slip.
  8. the french have been trying for decades to get the EU language to be primarily french a 2nd referendum wouldn't surprise me, i think for a lot of people even in the remain camp wanted a leave vote in order to see if they could get better terms. i think when they get close to what they want, they'll either have a 2nd vote or just overturn it in the commons and put us in. if sturgeon had stayed onboard for now at least to see what they could push for they'd be in a better position, but shes just undermining things at the moment. its about putting the pressure back on the EU. As Chesterfield said its about who blinks first. at the last negotiations we had no leverage nothing to play with, Cameron knew it at the time its why we got bog all. now if we let them sweat for a bit and then go back to the table, and the leverage we now have is the possibility to destabilise the EU or even unravel it, they are going to sit up and take far more notice. and if we don't we go anyway. its one hell of a gamble, but could see something happen that keeps all parties moderately happy.
  9. but I wonder what will be part of the deal for Scotland to join the EU, I have a feeling they will have to adopt the Euro, they'll be modelled on the irish, if that's a positive or a negative I don't know and at this point with the risk attatched to the Sterling would swapping to a Eruo for Scotland be a good thing?
  10. I voted on economic reasons, i envisioned a future over a much longer term that saw us safer out than in. i am also not stupid enough to think that it was going to be walk in the park getting there. I am fully aware that it will be peoples jobs and homes on the line in what will be a tough time getting there. my mortgage is at as much risk as everybody else. it wasn't a decision i took lightly and now think "woopi lets fudge the country up" i also think it will take us about 10 years to get to where we need to be, but possibly start to see the turn after 5 years. I'm also early 30's i'm in it for the long haul, initiating brexit now i think is a bad move, Europe needs to start feeling the burn before they'll negotiate with any kind of fairness. there needs to be other countries applying the same pressure. I think plans won't get off the ground until next year. i think we still have to get out the way, tory leadership battle, labour leadership battle, reshuffle of parties and then a general election before christmas. After that i think we'll be in a posistion to start properly; around spring time, at which point other countries may well be doing their own referendum
  11. I honestly think (I know i'm shortening this to a base level to make it easier to explain and I don't believe it is that simple) this has got to be played out like a game of poker, from the start before the out vote was confirmed and the last 12 months of run up has been one large version of call my bluff. with the EU basically calling us out to see if we mean it. with no real intenetion of making any change. whats shocked them is we just pulled out a hell mary pass. and it needs to be played out. its all a waste if we just fold and do what they want. the whole fact that there is a mass of uncertainty is part of its advantage. the fact we voted this way has already started the ball rolling of them having to inact change. something we could never have done if we'd stayed at the table. what they also have to deal with is that there are going to be more cards on the table soon, no gaurentees but several others could be pushing for a referendum, if the EU think there is enough risk that they'll come unstuck it could change the negotiation table. I still don't think we'll leave, I think they'll be some shinanigans in parliament and they'll hold a vote, they'll all vote to stay and we'll end up staying. but hopefully by that point it gives the EU the nudge to change it needed. if of course we do leave it might give us the leverage to get the deals we want/need. if we just left no arguments then the proposed Norway model etc is exactly what we'll get. if we roll over straight away it gives the EU time to regroup in order to deal with the next few issues. if we were to leave slowly take our time; yes it will have an economical hurt in the short term but it could mean that in the spring the EU is fire fighting on multiple fronts a quick and easy deal would be far more appealing. I don't know if this is the plan, but it makes no sense to come out and directly say just that, its like playing a "boris" play dumb but actually be pretty switched on with your end goal. its a major gamble which could have horrific fallout if it goes the wrong way, but if played out and timed well could see things not as bad as people think. I should add at no point do I think it will be easy or without sacrifice. I've been through financial hardship I wouldn't want to again and my job in the public sector is probably high risk if it all goes belly up. but I weighed it up and decided it was worth the risk, I didn't take the decision lightly and my childrens future is riding on this as much as everyone elses.
  12. Daniel Hannan is very good at putting his point across, I thought a lot of what he said made sense pre the referendum; I also like Hilary Benn, I honestly think the negotiation party if there ever is one (still not convinced anyone will actually pull the trigger (I think it will get voted out in parliament once the dust has settled)) should be cross party mix of labour, conservative lib dem, greens scots etc
  13. My Australian passport makes me more appealing than a chicken nugget at a childrens fat camp.
  14. Australia used to be a keen trade partner till we snubbed them for Europe. they would be up for a new free tade agreement, but it would need to be renegotitiated, apparently they won't just allows us to take the old one out the draw and dust it off.
  15. The petition on the gov site is now past 3 million and increasing at an average of 50 votes a second. Are they hoping to get the number past that of those who goes to leave?

350z-uk.com

370z-uk.com

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