Jump to content
Ekona

The Safe Driving Thread *Updated 2016*

Recommended Posts

Looking as far down the road as you can.

It also helps on long distance driving too, :thumbs: as you don't get as tired driving as you're eyes aren't working as hard constantly refocusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I nearly got killed 5 hours ago. 70Mph 360 degree spin in RH lane of a motorway, ended up crashing into concrete central reservation. Combination of a reaction to someone starting to undertake me as I was moving into the lane (having previously mirrored and signalled as a good boy should) and then seeing the car in front braking hard. Split second choice. Something went wrong and I think it was the back that spun out. Maybe I even made the right choice as I avoided both the car in front and the undertaking vehicle.. somehow.

 

Walked away with no more than a bruised leg and a shed that was bordering on scrap value anyway.

 

No police interest so far, no statement\ breathalyser etc. Only a black mark on the concrete, and some tyre marks to show what happened.

 

Lesson: You can know what to do when discussing theory, but the moment when things conspire to all go wrong at the same moment you only have 0.5 seconds to react, not even that, your instincts will take over. Don't expect people to follow all the rules of the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I nearly got killed 5 hours ago. 70Mph 360 degree spin in RH lane of a motorway, ended up crashing into concrete central reservation. Combination of a reaction to someone starting to undertake me as I was moving into the lane (having previously mirrored and signalled as a good boy should) and then seeing the car in front braking hard. Split second choice. Something went wrong and I think it was the back that spun out. Maybe I even made the right choice as I avoided both the car in front and the undertaking vehicle.. somehow.

 

Walked away with no more than a bruised leg and a shed that was bordering on scrap value anyway.

 

No police interest so far, no statement\ breathalyser etc. Only a black mark on the concrete, and some tyre marks to show what happened.

 

Lesson: You can know what to do when discussing theory, but the moment when things conspire to all go wrong at the same moment you only have 0.5 seconds to react, not even that, your instincts will take over. Don't expect people to follow all the rules of the road.

 

Sorry to hear that. Glad you're ok!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After passing my test in the UK, my first time in a car, 'on my own', was somthing of a trial by fire, as it was in rush hour traffic in Naples in a left hand drive car. Having driven there I can certainly say that driving in the UK is a breeze by comparison. However, no matter how familiar you are with your own local roads, or how confident you are in your own abilities, you just cant account for that one person putting their lippy on, or sending a text message. The 'B' roads around where I live are in a pretty sad state still too, (though they are getting there with repairs) and meeting someone on a corner on your side of the road trying to avoid a crater, or a lumber lorry cutting the corner a bit tight, certainly helps to adhere you to your seat and make you think twice about throwing your car into a corner at any speed (even when you know the car is nowhere near the limit, either speed or grip).

I still have fun though, and I guess its a case of 'Common Sense Rules'! Its just that some seem to have more of it than others!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another handy hint I pinched the other day:

 

 

When waiting at a roundabout behind traffic, don't look for the gap. Instead, keep your vision fixed on the car in front until they're actually on the roundabout itself, and then look for space to progress. This completely removes any risk of running into the car in front because you thought they were going to go but didn't :thumbs:

 

I've been trying it myself recently and it actually makes no difference to making progress, as it only takes a really quick glance to see if the roundabout is free or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When waiting at a roundabout behind traffic, don't look for the gap. Instead, keep your vision fixed on the car in front until they're actually on the roundabout itself, and then look for space to progress. This completely removes any risk of running into the car in front because you thought they were going to go but didn't :thumbs:

Bingo!!! :#1::thumbs: One of large contributing factors, if more people focused on the car in front at insections etc, there would be a lot less accidents!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

When overtaking, never pull back in until you can see the car in your rear view mirror. Now I'm pretty good at leaving space anyway but for the last week I've been using this technique on the motorways instead, and I have to say that it's utterly fool proof. Once you can see the car is behind you, the gap you leave when pulling back in is perfect and almost 100% prevents any coming together of the two vehicles.

I was taught to do this by my instructor when I learned to drive. I have always done it. I see the car in my wing mirror then check the rear view before pulling across. I have noticed a big difference with the pick up than an other car for this. If I used the wing mirror only I'd be cutting it closer than I'd like.

 

 

Looking as far down the road as you can. This is my personal biggest flaw as a driver as I tend to look only a short distance past the bonnet which can mean for a staccato drive at times, but if you force yourself to look as far down the road as you can see you'll find that your vision will automatically pick up what's happening immediately around you, and you'll naturally start to leave that crucial 2-second gap which allows for your planning time to increase. It feels horrible at first, but the more I do it the more benefit I'm getting from it and hopefully it'll come more naturally with time.

 

 

I'm taught one this at work.... Look as far into the distance as possible, from the horizon right back to the end of the bonnet. It sounds wierd but the more you do it the more if becomes natural. Then you really start seeing whats going on in front of you. It can mean that you'll make better progress as you know whats happening and you can also improve your MPG by anticipating things way off in the distance.

 

 

 

 

I'll actually ask the driving dudes if I can get our theory stuff to share as some of it is good. Nice clear explanations of vanishing point cornering and stuff too. Our instructors are brilliant too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi - this my first post. Collecting my first Z (2007 GT) next week, and being a little apprehensive as well as excited, I thought a bit of safety reading wouldn't harm.

 

I found it all very helpful, especially the bit about roundabouts. I was a passenger in an accident at one - the experience kept me safe for 20 years until I did the same thing myself! Let's hope I've learnt the lesson this time.

 

Focusing a way ahead is certainly a good tip - something I learnt long ago riding a motorbike. But not too effective at roundabouts!

 

A belief that 'the buggers are all out to kill you' does lead to self-preservation too.

 

Cheers :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Familiarity certainly does breed contempt. I wonder how many

of you got caught up in the M3 M25 right hook to Gatwick

last Thursday morning. A Peugot van was doing approx 55mph

round that corner which is blind, and ran straight into wall of traffic.

The van ploughed into the back of a stationary vehicle and went

airborne landing on the grass slope underneath the flyover. neither

the van nor the car will legally be put back on the road.

Thenoname

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a PSV/LGV Driving Instructer and course tutor in transport

studies I teach the art of scanning, looking at the foreground

the near ground, both sides, behind and up above (where possible)

The one question I always ask experienced driver's is what do

they think they now do since passing their test. after a while someone

will come up with the answer. it's the amount of risk they now take

where b4 they wouldn't. ie pulling out sooner. not covering

the brake at junctions and lights ect. and the faster your car

the more risks we tend to take.

And l am just as guilty.

Thenoname

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a really good thread, not enough of these on other forums in my opinion. I hope you dont mind my input on this, being new and all.

Ive actually been trained in fast road driving.

 

One thing from the original post id like to add to if thats ok. For normal driving on normal roads you need to be able to stop in the distance you can see. On country roads they taught us that the stopping distance is half the distance you can see. On coming traffic needs time to stop aswell and they wont be able to see you if you cant see them.

 

Another thing they teach is to keep your vision up. Be looking well ahead into the distance having hazards identified well before you reach them and Adjusting to changes. When on country roads looking through tree lines or in large dips, thrying to identify other road users at the earliest oppurtunity. And looking for signs that other road users are giving you eg parked cars steering wheels moving drivers heads turning, little things that before id not have payed attention to.

 

Having done the course it doesnt make me a faster driver, anyone can drive fast, it has tought me how to do it in a safer way being more aware of what else is going on around me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you a traffic rozzer ?

This is a really good thread, not enough of these on other forums in my opinion. I hope you dont mind my input on this, being new and all.

Ive actually been trained in fast road driving.

 

One thing from the original post id like to add to if thats ok. For normal driving on normal roads you need to be able to stop in the distance you can see. On country roads they taught us that the stopping distance is half the distance you can see. On coming traffic needs time to stop aswell and they wont be able to see you if you cant see them.

 

Another thing they teach is to keep your vision up. Be looking well ahead into the distance having hazards identified well before you reach them and Adjusting to changes. When on country roads looking through tree lines or in large dips, thrying to identify other road users at the earliest oppurtunity. And looking for signs that other road users are giving you eg parked cars steering wheels moving drivers heads turning, little things that before id not have payed attention to.

 

Having done the course it doesnt make me a faster driver, anyone can drive fast, it has tought me how to do it in a safer way being more aware of what else is going on around me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nope not a traffic rozzer.

Paramedic?

 

Who done the training? More people should be doing this sort of training. Oh and roundabout lane discipline aswell. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prefer not to say on an open forum mate. Course is not a general course though. Certain elements should be taught on driving lessons though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its good to see the forum promoting safe driving.

 

One that's always good to learn is to not look at the inside of a bend, always look at the curb or white line, or whatever marks the outside edge - this stops you from tightening up on the inside of the bend (as you may use this as a target and drive toward it) and potentially cross into the other line of oncoming traffic. :drive1

 

I'm lucky enough to live within shot of some of the most picturesque roads in the country Evo triangle/elan valley/Black Mountain pass, etc., Its easy to see why these roads are stunning, but also dangerous and to not be taken lightly. Looking as far down the road, across the hills etc IS a life saver and can help you prepare for potential obstacles (sheep, down trees, sitting water, Citroen Saxos racing...)

 

Being prepared, being aware, being sensible and being patient; all play a part in enjoying a sports car such as a Zed, but also staying safe. I'm very happy to see we're all on the same page!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a repost but apt to justify the reasons for safe driving.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 you g brothers and a woman killed on the M6 in bad conditions....

 

Travelled today and people were barrelling past in really heavy rain and as it wasn't busy lots of standing water :surrender:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good advice, remember to pull to towards the middle of the road on a left bend and to the left on a right bend to give maximum visability!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read this thread with interest.

 

I find that one big problem that people can have when driving a zed or any other type of sports car is over confidence. A few years ago I owned a Toyota Supra and I really did love driving that car. The thing is, the more i drove the car, the more I started to believe that I knew it's limits. I would hit a bend at 50 and cruise through it with so much grip, the car running the camber perfectly. I found that I was able to push it just a little bit further each time. All the while becoming more convinced that hey, I am a great driver and i know this car. Until that one fateful evening when I turned my car into a bend that i know well and lost the back end and couldn't correct. Consequently slamming the car into the verge, before spinning almost 360 degrees and coming to a halt about 50 yards further down the road.

 

That experience was a huge lesson in humility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

350z-uk.com

370z-uk.com

×
×
  • Create New...