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BLEEDING BRAKES

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If I need to change discs and pads at the same time should I bleed the brakes before or after installing?

 

The brakes should only require bleeding of you break into the system or you change the fluid.

A simple rotor and pad swop out should not require bleeding. :thumbs:

Alex :)

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All need doing. Brake fluid wasnt done at the service cause i didnt want them messing about with it due to the bloke saying the pads and discs needed doing.

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All need doing. Brake fluid wasnt done at the service cause i didnt want them messing about with it due to the bloke saying the pads and discs needed doing.

 

 

Okay, in answer to your question.

 

Fit rotors and pads first and then change the fluid and bleed :thumbs:

 

Alex :)

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Cheers

 

Can you pm me a price list for brakes discs and pads you can supply please

 

Paul

 

 

PM on its way Paul :thumbs:

 

Alex :)

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Just bled the brakes after fitting braided lines, and car was jacked up one wheel at a time to get to the nipple, and it is spongy when I press the brakes - does the car have to be level when bleeding??

 

I bled the system twice just to be safe! Changed to motul RBF600. Pump 3 times - open and then close the nipple. Rear left, front right, rear right, front left. Inside nipple first and then outer on the fronts.

 

The brakes firm up if I press it a second time quickly.

 

I looked and found no leaks with the brake lines?

 

IF I did get air into master cylinder - is there a simple fix? - I'm sure I didn't get any in but just in case as a last resort..

 

I'm worrieeedd!

 

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Bleeding them twice is nothing, I went round the car 7 times when I changed my lines, pads and discs, still bloody spongey. Ended up giving up and paid £40 to get it sorted.

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You still got air in your lines! I had same issue...bled it twice, and on 1st press it was spongy then firm on 2nd...I drove it carefully for a week and then bled it again and now it's spot on!

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Yea driving it for a while then re bleeding probably would have sorted it out for me too, however I really couldn't be arsed jacking all 4 corners up and removing the wheels all over again, hence the lazy £40 :lol:

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Makes me worried reading this thred, I need to do this once the braided lines arrive from the GB on here. I have one of those 1 man bleeding kits with the 1 way valve in it. We shall see...

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Nothing hard...a bit of patience, follow guide and make sure you don't run out of brake fluid in reservour and you'll be fine!

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I may want to change to braided hoses and RBF600 fluid, I'll be using a vacuum kit. My question is, I will need to drain the entire system of the DOT4 before using the silicone based fluid (I'm aware they don't mix) - In doing this, the mastercylinder will of be emptied. Have you all bled the master cylinder using the vacuum method to good effect or did you just pull the fluid through the system using the bleed nipples on the calipers.

 

Thanks

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Hey guys,

I need to change the brake fluid. Reading through this thread it looks like it should be simple (follow the set bleeding order and apply constant pressure to the pedal throughout the bleed) although I can guarantee I'll run into some sort of unexpected problem.

What is the current best brand of fluid? ATE TYP200 ok?

How much should I buy? 1 Litre?

My driveway slopes.....should I find somewhere flat to do this or does it not really matter?

Do I need to get some tubing for bleeding, and if so....what size?

Any other useful tips not already mentioned in this thread?

Many thanks!

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Motul 600 or 660 is the good fluid and 1ltr should be enough.

Regarding slope - I think it's better to have car jacked up and wheel off, easier to access bleeding nipples that way. So even surface would be safer for this.

I used normal 500ml plastic bottle with a little hole in the lid and then used clear hose (can't remember the size, but so I just fits over bleeding nipples). One end of hose fed through the hole in the lid, so old brake fluid drains into the bottle, and other end goes over the nipple when you undo it, so it doesn't squirt everywhere.

And follow bleeding procedure.

Remember that there are 2 nipples on brembo calipers and make sure you don't run brake fluid bottle dry, as you will get air in the system and will have to bleed it again lol just keep topping it up to the top.

Hope that helps and not too confusing lol

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